I2S Available Internships

Only students who meet the following criteria are eligible to apply for an I2S internship:

  • Enrolled full-time and in good academic standing at the Flagstaff Mountain campus at the time of application and at the commencement of an internship
  • Admitted as a degree-seeking student pursuing a first bachelor's degree
  • Successfully completed at least 15 semester hours at NAU
  • Completed less than 75 semester hours (including transfer credits) when the internship begins.
  • International students: Check with your international adviser in CIE to determine your eligibility for employment at NAU

Applications will be accepted beginning December 15, 2014, for Spring 2015 I2S opportunities using the online application form link below. 

Application deadline: January 25, 2015. 

APPLICANTS: Consult the I2S Student Information and Student FAQ pages for application advice and more information about the program. 

This document lists the required information on the application form. Please review this and prepare your responses and attachments PRIOR to accessing the application form.

Online application form You should receive an email with your application responses.

You may apply for up to 3 internships during this application period. However, each internship will require a completing a SEPARATE application form. When you have completed and submitted your first application, you may log in again and complete the next one.  A word of advice: Be sure to tailor each application to the specific activities and expectations described for that position.

All communications or questions regarding these I2S internships, including the responsibilities, requirements, timeline, applications, and selection processes, should be directed to the Undergraduate Research Coordinator.

Spring 2015 Internships 

The Internship ID number is shown to the left of the title (e.g., Sp15.001, Sp15.013)

Sp15.001: Material Witnesses: Artifacts from the Holocaust & Nazi Germany

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
With an interest in Holocaust/genocide studies, traumatic memory, and reconciliation studies, I am working at the intersection of different academic disciplines. I have worked on several interdisciplinary undergraduate research projects that led to the traveling exhibit "Through the Eyes of Youth? Life & Death in the Bedzin Ghetto," the permanent installment of the Berlin Wall exhibit at University Union, and the ongoing Digital History Project to create an online resource for the Bedzin Ghetto exhibit. This smaller project, "Material Witnesses," concerns the photographing and cataloging of several artifacts from the Holocaust/Nazi Germany that the Martin-Springer Institute has in its possession. These materials need to be researched and grouped together for an online "exhibit" to be submitted to the Arizona Memorial Project (http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/cdm/about/).

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student would do the photographing and researching necessary for providing details about each object. The intern would then put this together as a small online "exhibit" for the Arizona Memorial Project, using the forms and software provided by the AZ Memorial Project. The project is exciting since it would involve engagement of different skills (historical research/ photographing/visual digital display, cataloging, and data entry). 

Other benefits to the student:
This project could be of interest to students coming from the disciplines of Museum Studies, Visual Communication, History, Arts & Cultural Management, Cultural Studies, Art History, Journalism, Photography, Anthropology, Public History, or a combination of these. The student will learn to negotiate self-motivated and partially self-directed project with genuine and professional mentoring, leading up to a project that will be publicly available. This project would be a big plus in a student’s portfolio or resume.

Additional qualifications:
Ability work independently; do historical research; has visual and creative design abilities; photographic skills; some skills in online data entry and design preferred.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Bjorn Krondorfer

Sp15.002: Reading, Reflecting, Storyboarding, and Designing

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
The student is expected to conduct research on rhetorical strategies and influences thereof. The data collected will lead to a design, hardcopy or digital, in one of the following media projects:

  • The importance of writing outside of English courses
  • Writing and research expectations at NAU
  • Design and presentation practice at NAU
  • Undergraduate Symposiums and professional practice at NAU

The student will research, analyze, synthesize and evaluate appropriate text and digital materials, and address how purpose and audience influence her/his design choices and choices of media used. The student will complete the internship by writing a research paper explaining the theoretical principles used to design the project.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will learn how to conduct research to understand how rhetorical situations affect daily decision-making, motivations, and how we are persuaded to think and act accordingly. The student will then take these new understandings and apply rhetorical approaches as they design prototypes for actual programmatic use.

Other benefits to the student:
By applying theoretical research to practical designs, the student is learning to move beyond what "feels" right to having a product that is the result of multiple drafts, intellectual revisions, as well as adapting ideas to multiple platforms.

Additional qualifications:
Interests in creative work grounded in rhetorical theory; self-directive projects that require cyclical research; and revising one's work multiple times to reach an end goal and not solely a personal goal.

Additional information:
The intern will be expected to work in collaboration with the Sp15.004 intern.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Nancy Barron

Sp15.003: An Anthology of Navajo Fiction, Poetry, and Non-Fiction: An Edited Collection for High School and College Readers

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
The Navajo Reader/Anthology is a jointly edited project with three esteemed colleagues (from other universities) in the field of American Indian literature.  When published, the reader will be the first comprehensive collection of writing by contemporary Navajo writers, aimed at student readers in high school and college settings. Well-established writers have all agreed to participate in this project. Extensive biographies, interviews, and reading questions tailored to state and federal standards (including the Common Core) will be included.

I will be finishing two chapters on Indigenous film ("Samson & Delilah" from Australia; "Boy" from New Zealand; "The Lesser Blessed" and "Rhymes for Young Ghouls" from Canada; and, "Winter in the Blood" and "Smoke Signals" from the United States), part of a larger project on the theme of resilience (and surviving trauma with links to colonization and its aftermath).

What the student will DO and LEARN:
In both cases, an intern would assist with research, bibliographic work, indexing of films, corroboration of transcriptions of films and written texts, editing and formatting, and development of question sets.

The student intern will have the opportunity to learn about the process of literary/filmic research and will gain extensive editorial experience, seeing a book and several chapters in various stages of production. The intern will have been exposed to work normally conducted only by graduate-level students and post-graduates, early on in their undergraduate academic careers.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will have the opportunity to be involved in a project invested in global learning and diversity initiatives in two projects that will make a major impact in the field of Indigenous Studies and that will command the attention of students and scholars alike. The student intern's name will be affiliated with both projects and will be mentioned in acknowledgments. I will also be willing to write a detailed, substantive letter of recommendation upon completion of the internship.

Additional qualifications:
Willingness to learn, with an interest in research and editorial production.

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Jeff Berglund

Sp15.004: Designing for Practice: Analysis and Application of Research to Design a Youtube Video

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
The student is expected to conduct research and design one of the following Youtube videos:

  • Introduction to writing, rhetoric, and digital media
  • Writing expectations at NAU
  • Faculty perceptions of writing at NAU
  • Student perceptions of writing at NAU

The student will need to research, analyze, synthesize and evaluate appropriate text and digital materials, and address how purpose and audience influence her/his design choices and choices of media used. The student will complete the internship by writing a research paper explaining the theoretical principles used to design the project.

What the student will DO and LEARN:

  • The student will learn to design a project that analyzes, synthesizes and evaluates appropriate text and digital materials
  • The student will learn to design a project that shows the ethical use of language in diverse academic, public, and professional communities.
  • The student will learn how to address how purpose and audience influence design choices in text and digital media, showing understanding of rhetorical approaches to multimedia design
  • The student will research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles to the project and final report paper to question current norms and dominant cultural assumptions expressed in text and digital media

Other benefits to the student:
The student interested in this project will gain important skills in managing time, finding resources, evaluating resources, and working with faculty outside the classroom. The student will also be able to apply professional workplace skills (managing a project, setting deadlines, providing progress reports, collaborating with peers and faculty, and completing a project based on research).

Additional qualifications:
Creative, self-directed student who is willing to work independently and who is also willing to follow directions.

Additional information:
The intern will be expected to work in collaboration with the Sp15.002 intern.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Sibylle Gruber

Sp15.005: Definitions of Gamer Identity at a Videogame Symposium

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
In a post-gamergate culture (broadly defined) where students may or may not be aware of gamergate, how do participants at a Videogame Symposium report defining hard core gamer, gamer, casual gamer, and various variations of identity words. In this project, a student will support research by assisting with the development of a survey to be distributed at the Undergraduate Videogame Symposium March 26th, 27th and 28th, 2015. The student will then assist in reviewing, interpreting, contextualizing and writing about the results.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
A student will learn to research an issue related to cultural artifacts (videogames), identities and ideologies portrayed by those artifacts, learning in videogames, and videogame influence on identity construction. The student will then assist in designing a study based in social science methodologies, to collect survey data during a Videogame Symposium, and to then interpret and contextualize survey results to better understand how participant definitions related to 'gamer' may or may not have been impacted/influenced by gamergate.

Other benefits to the student:
This student will be exposed to a broad range of social research related to videogame studies, including English, literacies, learning, psychology, biology, and cultural studies to contextualize data results within a cross-disciplinary approach to game studies.

Additional qualifications:
No videogame experience required to apply and participate with this internship; willingness to explore a few games to understand and contextualize participant data beyond “good” and/or “fun” games preferred.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Amber Nicole Pfannenstiel

Sp15.006: Long-term Fire History of Coastal Temperate Rainforests, Prince William Sound, Alaska

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Since 1995 I have been involved in research into the history of vegetation and climate change and disturbance history of forests in southern Alaska. In 2010 and 2011, we collected a series of sediment cores from the coastal temperate rain forest of southwest Alaska. Essentially nothing is known about the history of forest fire in this vegetation type. In 2011/12 a NAU undergraduate (Damara Kautz) researched the vegetation history of one of the sites, Cabin Lake. Paul Zander, another NAU undergraduate, analyzed the sedimentary characteristics. The I2S intern would perform the sedimentary charcoal analysis of this core to be able to integrate the fire history story with the climate and vegetation history record.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Our long-term records of forest fire are obtained from analysis of small subsamples of sediment cores extracted from lakes. The intern will take small subsamples of sediment from Cabin Lake, sieve the sediments to extract the charcoal generated from any forest fire and plant remains that have been washed into the lake, tally the charcoal and then use a computer program, Charanalysis, to statistically determine the frequency of fires at the site in the past. This project will involve no fieldwork, but instead a considerable amount of labwork with sieving the sediments, identifying the charcoal and any other plant remains in the sieved sediments, and manipulating the data. The intern will learn lab techniques and computer programs, as well as be able to interpret the data.

Other benefits to the student:
In addition to the above, the intern will be part of a research team, producing an important and integral piece of research. S/he will be exposed to research on the cutting edge of our field, considering that at the present time we know virtually nothing about the history of fire in these forests. S/he will be required to discuss the results with other members of the team, learning what it is like to work with different individuals with different knowledge to benefit the whole - the way of Environmental Sciences.

Additional qualifications:
The intern should have an interest in both botany and geology.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks 

Faculty Name: R. Scott Anderson

Sp15.007: Use of Mosses in Mitigating Soil Erosion Post-fire

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Our lab is focusing on best practices for recovery of soil health and hydrological function to restore diverse habitats of the intermountain west. We are particularly interested in soil stabilizing techniques to prevent dust storms in drylands, and recover forest ecosystems after stand-destroying fire. Mosses are a key component of recovery in both cases, because they stabilize the soil surface against erosion, promote water retention and soil fertility, and allow for the establishment of additional biota such as grasses, shrubs, and trees. The goal of this project will be to speed up moss colonization and subsequent soil stability. An I2S Intern will work closely with our team to 1) conduct experiments to determine optimal growth of these species in the greenhouse and to provide restoration material, 2) plan and conduct field experiments using field-collected material to mitigate soil loss and improve water infiltration and 3) monitor natural colonization of mosses across the burn severity gradient.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will learn basic and cutting edge techniques in restoration ecology by planning, initiating, maintaining, monitoring and interpreting results from the Slide Fire projects. Specifically, s/he will learn moss identification, irrigation system maintenance, development of restoration materials, experimental design, ecology sampling techniques, microscopy and photo-monitoring and image analysis.

Other benefits to the student:
These diverse experiences in project planning and implementation will be an outstanding resume builder. Our intern will be integrated into an active and collegial research laboratory, with undergraduate and graduate researchers and a post-doctoral scholar. The intern will have the opportunity to be involved in all stages of research, from development of hypotheses, to experimental implementation, data collection, analysis and interpretation. This is also a unique opportunity because our work serves the needs of land management agencies, giving the student access to diverse perspectives, an understanding of local and regional management issues, and potentially, additional internship opportunities.

Additional qualifications:
Candidates should have a GPA of 3.0 or greater, ideally with some background in biology, forestry, and/or environmental sciences. We prefer candidates with a specific interest in ecology and restoration.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Matthew Bowker

Sp15.008: Adding Python to Model Oriented Programming Platform
Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
My research is focused developing innovative modeling techniques for software engineers, and applying such techniques in the healthcare domain. Our research platform called Umple, is a modeling platform that has been used in teaching 2nd and 3rd year software engineering and computer science students. The tool’s intended simplicity helps the students understand the value and role of models in software engineering. I am looking for a student to enhance the platform with support for Python, the programming language in use at NAU introductory computer science courses. The tool currently supports other languages (such as Java, C, C++, Ruby PhP). Support for Python is a prerequisite for using this modeling tool at NAU.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will be involved in the development of Python support in Umple. Umple is an active open source project, and follows a strict test driven development style. The student will learn about software development methodology by practice. S/he will learn how modeling languages are developed and will understand and appreciate the role of software design.

Other benefits to the student:
The student may decide to use a modeling approach in his/her professional career as a software engineer. This can be either by adopting Umple itself or by using other modeling tools.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Omar Badreldin
Sp15.009: Serviceability Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Discontinuity Regions

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
The objective of this research plan is to create a procedure that practicing engineers can use to predict the serviceability behavior of reinforced concrete discontinuity regions. Concrete specimens will be experimentally tested and crack width, crack density, and deformation measurements will establish their serviceability behavior. Data collected from this and past studies will be used to correlate the internal strain energy estimated from a representative strut-and-tie model (STM) to the expected serviceability behavior.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will assist a graduate student with fabrication and setup of testing configuration, test specimens, and data collection.

Other benefits to the student:
This experience will provide an undergraduate with insight into the requirements of experimental testing. To be successful in the laboratory, researchers must be able to validate results (BEFORE and after testing), and troubleshoot when things do not appear to be working correctly. Also, experimental testing requires researchers to have ability as cross-disciplinarian ("jack-of-all trade"). For example, it isn't enough that I have expertise in my field, I also need to have knowledge of electrical and mechanical engineering when conducting an experiment and/or trouble-shooting, not to mention the communication skills that are required to be able to explain the project to an audience with wide-ranging levels of comprehension. The undergraduate will gain insight into the fact that research and experimentation requires you to not only be an expert in your field - but to have solid foundation in other fields as well.

Additional qualifications:
Math skills, computer skills, or experience with power tools a plus but not required.

Time commitment: 6 hrs/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Robin Tuchscherer

Sp. 15.010: Systematics of the NominateSsubgenus Eleodes (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
A systematic investigation of the nominate Eleodes subgenus Eleodes, a widespread group of darkling beetles in western North America, would be undertaken by sequencing six gene fragments from both the mirochondrial and nuclear genomes for approximately 35 species and producing high resolution digital images of the species.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will extract and sequence DNA for a mid-sized group of beetles, database the voucher specimens for the Colorado Plateau Museum of Arthropod Biodiversity, and image the voucher specimens for online publication. The intern will learn DNA extraction and amplification methods, as well as best practices for museum vouchering and online dissemination of taxonomic data.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will also associate with other students in the lab, be exposed to systematic entomology and other biodiversity studies, and gain firsthand experience in how research is performed and why.

Additional qualifications:
Some biology background and interest is preferable, with at least an introductory biology class at NAU.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Aaron Smith

Sp15.011: Amicable Numbers in the Ring of Eisenstein Integers

Description of your research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support.
I am investigating the concept of an "amicable pair" but in the context of the Eisenstein integers. An "amicable pair" is a pair of integers whose proper divisors sum to each other (for instance, 220 and 284 are an amicable pair). The Eisenstein integers are a generalization of the familiar integers. I believe that no one has attempted to find amicable pairs in this context. The student intern would need to create a program (preferably in Mathematica) to factor Eisenstein integers as a means to discovering if any amicable pairs exist in this context.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern would learn (a) a little about the ring of Eisenstein integers, and (b) a LOT about programming in Mathematica.

Other benefits to the student:
This internship would shed a bit of light on what is involved in “doing” mathematical research.  In addition, the programming expertise the student develops in using Mathematica could benefit them in many ways in later endeavors.

Additional qualifications:
The intern needs some mathematical expertise and have completed at least MAT 137. The student would need to have an interest in developing some skills in programming.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Jeff Rushall

Sp15.012: Honoring Stories: Celebrating Indigenous Knowledges

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Through a survey, interviews and an Indigenous focus group, the study explores how an education college is meeting its stated goal to “Be a leading university/college serving Indigenous students.” The study was conducted through tenets of Critical Indigenous Research Methodologies (Brayboy, Gough, Leonard, Roehl, Solyom, 2012), specifically relationality, respect, reciprocity, responsibility and accountability. The study will draw on Tribal Critical Race Theory (Brayboy, 2006) to analyze the data. From the analysis, we identify themes that demonstrate effective ways to meet the stated goal and provide recommendations.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Student will learn how to outline, draft and submit a qualitative research article. Specifically, the student will (a) learn about qualitative research, (b) conduct literature review, (c) understand how theoretical framework and methodology inform research; (d) learn how to do thematic analysis to code data; (e) use analysis to write “findings” section; (e) write “findings” and “recommendations” section.

Other benefits to the student:
Student will be co-author for a journal article. We will submit to Journal of American Indian Education (JAIE); the editors have requested I submit an article about this study.

Additional qualifications:
Have a working knowledge and understanding of Indigenous issues and commitment to Indigenous education.

Additional comments or explanations that are relevant:
I will provide a detailed timeline to the student at the beginning of the semester so that we can work from it. I will be ready to extend “meeting/discussion” time if more mentoring and less individual work appears more supportive.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Christine Lemley

Sp15.013: Acquisition and Management of Data Collected from Individuals with Concussions Both Prior to and Following Individualized Rehabilitation Sessions

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Head injuries, specifically concussions, are commonly seen in athletics but due to recent media attention and public interest, research pertaining to both the assessment and treatment protocols have expanded. Unfortunately, there is not a generally accepted practice in the profession of Athletic Training for the assessment or treatment of these sports related injuries free of validity concerns. The current research, being completed by two faculty members in the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, assesses the validity and reliability of a newly created instrument that determines a subject’s cognitive abilities following a concussion. This instrument combines several aspects of cognitive function into one tool. The second purpose of the research is to implement individually tailored rehabilitation sessions for these subjects in order to see if concussive signs and symptoms decrease. Each concussion may present in a unique fashion so being able to tailor to specific weaknesses or strengths in an Athletic Training environment is useful.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will: (1) Participate in data acquisition of three different testing sessions [baseline, follow up 1 (17 days into the study), and follow up 2 (33 days into study)]. During this process the student will learn the proper steps to follow to collect reliable data and how treating each participant exactly the same is important. (2) After data acquisition, the student will learn how to maintain and organize data collection forms as well as transfer data from the hardcopy of the instrument and printed data from electronic assessments into SPSS. The use of repeated frequency and data checks will re-enforce the importance of proper coding and recording of data. A skill that is usable in a variety of research projects well beyond this one that the student will practice with the faculty mentor. (3) With practice and guidance, the student will learn the proper procedures in SPSS to run descriptive statistics, t-tests, correlations and ANOVAs on the variables of interest. (4) The students will also become comfortable, with direction from the faculty member, with the interpretation of the results from these statistical analyses. Basically, the student will discover how to determine if the results are meaningful and statistically significant. (5) Furthermore, upon reviewing of relevant statistical outcomes in the literature, familiarity with the data, and practice running simple statistics, the student will be encouraged to prepare a rough draft of the data analysis and results sections for a manuscript submission.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will learn how to appropriately enter data using SPSS, how to perform general descriptive statistics, entry level statistics such as t-tests, correlations and ANOVAs, as well as the need for well-planned data management and confidentiality. The student will also establish ownership and the subsequent pride that comes from exerting control over their own learning experiences. These skills will be useful for any student looking to pursue a graduate degree regardless of the discipline.

Additional qualifications:
Favorable criteria include previous experience working with numbers, being task oriented, and eagerness to learn new skills and the ability to work independently and as part of a research team are encouraged.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Monica Lininger

Sp15.014: Evaluation of Independently Tailored Rehabilitation Programs for Cognition, Visual Discernment, and Equilibrium in Independent Persons Living in Northern Arizona with Recalcitrant MTBI Symptoms

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) research is currently enjoying a wealth of media attention. A concussion is a disruption of mental functions, secondary to the skull being struck or violently moved or spun at a speed resulting in a sloshing of the brain inside the skull. Think about a Jell-O mold inside a bowl slightly larger than the mold being violently accelerated and decelerated in linear or rotational fashions. At the base of the concern is how many hits, how hard are the hits, and what is the summative result of those hits on athletes. Furthermore, what can be done for individuals that have sustained a concussion (singular or repetitive)? While we assess what summative number of hits or the force of those hits have on cognitive function, we need to treat those with post injury symptoms, regardless of singular or repetitive trauma. The current project pertaining to concussion is multifaceted, as the condition itself is. The first facet of the project is the assessment of individuals with signs and symptoms of concussion lasting longer than 14 days in regards to balance, vestibular function, vision, processing ability, and concentration. This is accomplished using a lab set up on an iPad based C3 Logix System, a PC based dynamic and stationary visual acuity system as well as a balance and vestibular function assessment, in addition to a set of paper and pencil assessments. The second facet is providing participants with therapy to address each of the above concerns in a multi-tasking approach. This will include specific training on the visual acuity system in conjunction with a PC based ABIME Cognitive Therapy Suite, and a Fit-Lights System. The Fit-Lights are a sequence of 8 illuminating disk set at various distances and speeds that participants respond to.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Due to the breadth in the project, and the amount of interest I have received from students in Exercise Physiology or other sciences during guest lectures, the student will be able to focus on any either of the two facets they find most personally intriguing. Regardless of the facet they find most interesting, students will help facilitate participant recruitment, scheduling, lab set up (iPad, PC, and the Fit-Lights System), and an understanding of using repeatable and valid measures when conducting research. Furthermore, the student will be guided in search methods to collect relevant literature related to the area they find most interesting. Students will also gain valuable insight to the methods to assess and treat concussions and what the longer-term sequelae are for MTBI.

Facet 1) The student will learn methods to assess concussion using established tools and protocols. They will also understand how these assessments relate to daily functional task of learning and active daily living skills.

Facet 2) The student will learn the progression of and difficulty related to concussion therapy and how it progresses on ability improvement and accounts for participants signs and symptoms. We won’t progress them if the symptoms are increasing with therapy Any student interested in this project will be intentionally limited to a focus on one of the two facets.

Other benefits to the student:
Aside from the previous items listed that the student will learn and additional items they can select based on their field of study and interest, participation in research provides students the opportunity to developed ownership in the project and their learning. This further enhances their desires to continue their education and hopefully fosters future creative ideas, specifically in this case to cognitive health.

Additional qualifications:
Positive attitudes toward constructive feedback, strong communication skills, and the ability to work independently and as part of a research team are encouraged.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Scot Raab

Sp15.015: “Second Step” Violence Prevention and Social Skills Development Program In a Multicultural Elementary Flagstaff School

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
The intern would (1) support the on-going grant-writing stage of Wilce and Fenigsen's research project concerned with "Second Step," violence prevention program in use in US schools and internationally since 1987, and (2) participate in a pilot ethnographic study (current IRB approval being finalized). The project builds on Wilce's prior, funded research on emotion socialization and emotion-related communication. The project has applied as well as primary research focus.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
With assistance from the mentors, the intern will acquire a range of skills essential for planning and doing research, including skills specific to doing research on human subject. The intern will (a) learn how to conduct meta-data analysis of the existing research (mostly qualitative), (b) participate in the planning and development of grant proposals, (c) complete IRB training, and (d) participate in the pilot stage of data gathering. Project-related arrangements with the elementary school, which is the project site, are in place.

Other benefits to the student:
In addition to developing specific skills involved in meta-analysis of research data, this internship offers opportunity for the student to acquire (a) preliminary skills in research design, (b) understanding of the research funding process, (c) understanding of ethical issues of research on human subjects, (d) IRB certification, (e) preliminary skills in conducting ethnographic fieldwork and data collection.

Additional qualifications:
Good writing skills. Clear interest in conducting social and behavioral science research, primary and applied. Ability to work with and without supervision. Excellent work habits. Experience in working with children/conducting classroom research or observation would be a plus but is not required.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Janina Fenigsen and Jim Wilce

Sp15.016: Investigating Medical Care at Immigration Detention Centers in Arizona

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) operates the largest detention program in the United States. At least twenty-five percent of this detained population suffers from chronic health problems, and at least fifteen percent suffer from depression and other mental illnesses. Although ICE promulgated detention standards to govern the provision of medical care, these standards, unlike standards in other US correctional facilities, are not legally enforceable. Detention centers are often in remote, hard-to-access locations, and even when concerned advocates make the trip, they are routinely denied access to meet with detainees. For the vast majority who lack formal legal representation, cultural, linguistic, and educational barriers prevent many detainees from being in a position to effectively self-advocate. Consequently, immigration detainees all too often languish in detention while their physical and mental health conditions deteriorate, causing them undue pain and suffering and impeding their ability to navigate the complex legal system within which they are embedded.

In an effort to improve conditions for this vulnerable population, the University of Southern California Law School ("USC") has initiated a multi-year study into the provision of medical care in ICE detention. As part of the pilot phase, the USC conducted negotiations with ICE and was granted unprecedented access to immigration detention facilities. Additionally, the project has already collected interviews with more than 70 detainees. Preliminary findings from these interviews indicate, among other serious issues, that ICE is failing to comply with numerous of its own detention standards, routinely denies or unnecessarily delays medical treatments, and that the inadequate care provided to detainees inhibits their ability to assert their rights, including their rights to relief from removal.

In October 2014, USC asked me to run the Arizona expansion of this program, studying the conditions and interviewing detainees at the unfortunately notorious detention centers within Arizona's borders.  No significant investigative work has begun in Arizona to date

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The undergraduate intern will, after learning the basic rights of detainees at such centers, (1) search government filings, media reports, and the Internet more broadly for information about current conditions at detention centers in Arizona. An initial review of public filings has already shown that the privately owned and operated ICE facility in Eloy, Arizona has the highest death rate of any such facility in the country. The undergraduate intern (2) will find, read and digest such filings and media reports. If the intern is interested, he or she will be invited to (3) draft the equivalent of a portion of the literature review for future publications of the final data (for which the student will be credited in publication).

Then, under my supervision, the intern (4) will draft Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. This is not a fill-in-the-blank task. Rather, the intern will be required to use the information learned in the initial research stage to ask the best and most significant questions and request by name or description what we expect to be key documents. The government can take a significant amount of time to respond to FOIA requests, so in the meantime, until those responses are received, the student, under close supervision, will (5) identify and potentially reach out to reporters, physicians, and other individuals peripherally involved in the provision of or investigation into care at these centers.

The intern will be encouraged (6) to present his or her work and findings at NAU campus events showcasing undergraduate research and (7) to attend one or more relevant conferences.

The intern’s work product will (a) help prioritize centers for further investigation; and (b) provide the foundation necessary for me to take a group of students next academic year to the highest priority centers to conduct interviews with detainees about conditions at the facilities. The intern’s work will also directly be used and relied upon in publications of findings from the completed investigation (hopefully at the conclusion of next academic year).

Other benefits to the student:
By engaging in the kind of hands-on, applied research described above, the student will develop his or her critical thinking skills, practical research skills, and professionalism. The student will learn how to correspond, both in writing and telephonically, with government agencies, officials, and possibly reporters. In identifying and answering these important threshold questions, the student will see first-hand how applied research studies are built from the ground up. Because the project is at a more advanced stage in California and Texas, the student will also, by modeling research conducted in those states, see how his or her work will be ultimately be put to use in producing a comprehensive review of provision of care at these facilities, and hopefully accompanying comprehensive reform. In the nearer term, I expect to provide the intern opportunities to present his or her initial findings at undergraduate conferences here at NAU in the Spring. An appropriately motivated and talented student may also be credited in publications stemming from this work.

In these ways, the intern will gain experiential learning in: conducting, presenting and possibly publishing scholarly research; advocating for an disadvantaged racial, linguistic, and national/ethic minority group; and, depending on when we are able to make the research findings publicly available (relative to the intern’s tenure with the project), engaging in or influencing civic engagement around these issues.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 10 weeks  

Faculty Name: Colleen Maring

Sp15.017: Volunteer Bias in Friendship Research: Self-selection in Volunteer Convenience Samples - Implications for Friendship Research among Emerging Adults

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
Volunteer bias has been documented in various research literatures including medical and sexual. Yet, it is not clear if such a bias is also present in friendship research and presents a challenge to the generalizability of the findings. Thus, the aim of this research is to investigate whether friendship experiences and the relationship of friendship with happiness are different among college students who were interested in volunteering for a study on same-sex friendship experiences relative to those who were not. Five studies will seek to address these questions within the context of friendship quality and its ties to well being, two important constructs within developmental psychology. The data for this project (n = 5884) were gathered in the past two years. Within each study, participants who had a same-sex best friend completed an online pretest, without being informed of the content matter (i.e., friendship). They were first asked whether they would be interested in volunteering to participate in a same-sex best friendship (SSBF) study. Those indicating "Yes" were classified as volunteers; those indicating "No" were classified as non-volunteers. Study 1 and Study 2 will test gender differences in willingness to participate in a study on same-sex friendship and test friendship duration as a potential moderator. Study 3 will investigate the whether the friendship experiences of volunteers and non-volunteers are different. Study 4 will extend the third study by focusing on various indices of friendship quality and examine whether the correlations between friendship and happiness are similar across the two groups (volunteer vs. non-volunteer). The final study, a short-term longitudinal study, will investigate whether non-volunteers end up participating in research on friendship in a given semester.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will do the following: 1) conduct a thorough literature review of the topic (volunteer bias in general, gender differences, documented volunteer bias in medical and sexuality research, and in research on friendship, if any); 2) review the samples and limitations sections of empirical articles on friendship published in the last decade (cited at least 50 times in the literature) to learn about the how generalizability issues are addressed and whether potential volunteer bias is accepted; 3) develop hypotheses in light of the literature; 4) download the data sets (gathered online in the past two years), transfer them to statistical software, perform basic data cleaning; 5) conduct the analyses under my supervision and test the hypotheses and write up the results; 6) write up sections of the introduction, method section and results section; 7) contribute to the writing of the discussion section; 8) submit this work as a talk to an international conference (7th Conference on Emerging Adulthood, Fall 2015); also present this work as a poster at the NAU Undergraduate Showcase in Spring 2015; 9) work on the final aspects of the manuscript that will be submitted for publication (1st choice: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships; 2nd choice: Personality and Individual Differences; 3rd Choice: Journal of Psychology); and 10) contribute to the "letter to the editor" when revising the manuscript.

The intern will learn the following: 1) how to conduct a literature review; 2) how to critically read empirical articles; 3) how to set up data sets; 4) the importance of conducting multiple studies when focusing on a specific topic; 5) how to create composite scores from the variables (responses to the items); 6) how to analyze data and test hypotheses and write up the results; 7) how to write a paper; 8) how to submit a paper to a conference; 9) how to finish a manuscript (start to finish) and submit it for publication; 10) how to communicate with editors; and 11) how to use archival data.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will learn the basics of how to conduct research. Although the intern will not gather data, the intern will learn the value of archival data. The intern will also learn basic and advanced skills necessary to conduct analyses and write a paper for publication. The intern will also present this work at a conference and submit this for publication. These activities would add to the intern’s CV and will help establish skills necessary for a future scholar. The intern will also learn about volunteer bias, an issue that challenges the generalizability of psychological studies conducted with convenience samples.

Additional qualifications:
Interest in friendship research, data analyses, and disseminating this work in different forms.

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Meliksah Demir

Sp15.018: Simulations + Blended Learning + World Politics = "Hey, I Know What a Chechen Black Widow Wants!"

Description of specific research, scholarly, or creative project that the student intern will support:
I will be transforming a paper presented at the 2015 American Political Science Association's Teaching and Learning Conference into a paper to be submitted for publication in PS: Political Science journal.  This paper focuses on the integration of the teaching technique of simulations into Blended Learning lower division political science classes.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will gather data on the use of simulations in undergraduate courses in the US. In addition, s/he will gather data on the growth of Blended Learning courses in the US. The intern will also do careful analysis of the requirements of the journal I'd like to publish in, and help me format the paper in the appropriate manner. The intern will learn some of the basic techniques of research, including finding and analyzing data, organizing the data, writing it up in clear and accurate ways, and then preparing a paper for scholarly publication.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will learn how to engage in scholarly research and be exposed to interesting work on the scholarship of teaching.

Additional qualifications:
Interest in political science, strong organizational skills, good work ethic

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty Name: Gretchen Knudson Gee