I2S Available Internships

Only students who meet the following criteria are eligible to apply for an I2S internship:

  • Enrolled full-time and in good academic standing at the Flagstaff Mountain campus at the time of application and at the commencement of an internship
  • Admitted as a degree-seeking student pursuing a first bachelor's degree
  • Successfully completed at least one full-time semester at NAU
  • Completed less than 75 semester hours (including transfer credits) when the internship begins.
  • International students: Check with your international adviser in CIE to determine your eligibility for employment at NAU

The application period for this semester ended on Sunday, January 31, 2016.

APPLICANTS: Consult the I2S Student Information and Student FAQ pages for application advice and more information about the program. 

NOTE: To log into the application form, your NAU password must NOT have special characters such as these (?, period, [, {, }, ], |). If your password has one or more of these characters, you will need to first change your password in the NAU system.
Interested in what the application entails? This document lists the required information on the application form.

ONLINE APPLICATION FORM

You should receive an email with your application responses.

You may apply for up to 3 internships during this application period. However, each internship will require a completing a SEPARATE application form. When you have completed and submitted your first application, you may log in again and complete the next one.  A word of advice: Be sure to tailor each application to the specific activities and expectations described for that position.

All communications or questions regarding these I2S internships, including the responsibilities, requirements, timeline, applications, and selection processes, should be directed to the Undergraduate Research Coordinator.

Spring 2016 Internships 

The Internship ID number is shown to the left of the title (e.g., Sp16.001)

Sp16.001: Between Thought and Feeling: Films within Films

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Student intern will help me revise and expand my bibliography for this project, and will help me organize the research bibliography for this manuscript. Student will also watch at least four of the films that I have written about or will write about for this project, the better to understand the idea at play.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will help me search for articles, books, film reviews, and additional materials relevant to my research project, which is about film form and film history. I am interested in the ways that films-within-films operate like "objective correlatives" for the frame film: that is, films-within-films allow for affective or emotional experiences and ideas to take place that the frame film can only gesture toward. Students will learn the basics of online and library scholarly research, and learn the basics of formal film analysis and film history.

Other benefits to the student:
My hope is that whomever requests or secures this internship would be interested in internships in film/media studies or film/media not-for-profit organizations. I am currently the Coordinator for the Cinema Studies Minor. In Spring 2016, I would like to develop a series of internships for CCS Majors, English Majors, and Cinema Studies Minors in film/media. Should this I2S internship work and the student be interested, I would be able to point that student in the direction of other internships which the student would then be well-qualified to take on. And of course, if this student is interested in graduate study, any and all opportunities to be a research intern or research assistant can be invaluable.

Additional qualifications:
Must like film.

Time commitment:  5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Rebecca Gordon, English

Sp16.002: Of No Ground: Late Days in Small Island States

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This book-length environmental writing project will utilize data from climate researchers throughout the country—specifically measurements of sea level and projected sea-level rise—in order to tell the human story of climate change. Writers from AOSIS (the Alliance of Small Island States), an ad hoc lobby within the United Nations, will be solicited to write essays about their home country. For example, a Maldivian author will write a micro essay (creative nonfiction) about her country, and the prose will be transformed into the current (and projected) shapes of her home country. Like "concrete poetry" popularized by Noigrandes in the mid-20th century, these "concrete essays" will be the product of a true collaboration between climate researchers and people who live in the world's lowest-lying forty-three countries. It will chart the vanishing land in tandem with the literary and cultural heritages of the land.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern will draft professional emails to scholars and writers from across the world, soliciting nominations for this anthology. Upon collecting their responses, the nominations will be added to a database, and the student—with the help of a research librarian at Cline Library—will research works (including novels, collections, and anthologies) in which these writers have appeared. After compiling a digital folder of the high-priority authors' work, the student and I will read through the texts; create annotated bibliographies for each story, essay, or poem; and discuss each nominee's fitfulness for the project using a rubric we will mutually develop. Finally, as representative authors are selected (e.g., X from Kiribati, X from Tuvalu, X from Vanuatu), the student will draft solicitation emails to those authors and translators, formally inviting them to participate in this project. The student will acquire and hone skills in professional communication, database management, research inquiry, portfolio assembly, annotated bibliography writing, anthology editing, and he/she will participate regularly in critical reading and discussion.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will have an understanding and appreciation of interdisciplinary scholastic activity. I would welcome the opportunity to help the student plan for a likeminded project and connect him/her to the appropriate campus resources, if he/she has the sense that such a project is on the horizon.

Additional qualifications:
Excellent written and verbal communication skills; impeccable organizational skills.

Time commitment:  4 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Lawrence Lenhart, English

Sp16.003: Enhancing Sustainable Water Reclamation Using Algal-based Biotechnology: The Influence of Salinity on Lipid Production

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Microalgae (and cyanobacteria) are used to enhance the reclamation of waters having elevated dissolved minerals. One aspect of this project is to quantify the influence that these waters have on microalgae lipid accumulation. Although there are several methods for conducting either qualitative or quantitative lipid analysis, this project aims to be able to determine potential changes in the distribution different lipid types (polar and neutral) that may be influenced by different salinity conditions during growth. In this regard, a method capable of determining minimally these two different types of lipids is desired.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will perform 1) a literature search on solvent fractionation of lipids and to include a written literature review, 2) analytical trials for developing a laboratory method using solvent fractionation to quantify different lipid types and to include a written method procedure, and 3) the method's application to quantify lipid content in association with experiments intended to determine the influence that various levels of dissolved minerals have on the lipid content in microalgae.

Other benefits to the student:
This internship will provide the student with an opportunity to be heavily involved in the research that intends to lead toward the development of a general method for measuring total lipids in two or more fractions. Having the experience of applying the knowledge gained from previous investigators (i.e., from the literature review) to work leading to a method that can be tested will be a tremendous benefit to the growth of the student's capacity for future scholarly work.

Additional qualifications:
Demonstrated experience in a laboratory setting (classroom laboratory class experience acceptable) and at least currently enrolled in an organic chemistry course.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Terry Baxter, CECMEE

Sp16.004: Milkweeds for Monarchs: Citizen Science Project to Determine Suitable Milkweed Species for Home Gardens in Central Arizona

Description of the project that the student intern will support.
Monarch butterfly populations have declined dramatically in recent years despite broad and intense conservation efforts. Professor Hofstetter in collaboration with Regents Professor Emeritus Mike Wagner are starting a new project to help save Monarch butterflies and restore habitat resources (i.e. milkweeds) to improve Monarch migration survival through Arizona. The student will help build a project to use citizen volunteer gardeners in Flagstaff and Sedona to assess the suitability of a range of milkweeds (Asclepias spp) for addition to home gardens and determine their utilization by monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) at these two elevations in Arizona. A common garden experimental design will be used to evaluate the best milkweed species to plant for Monarch recovery. The design is pretty simple and involves selecting species for a proposed location based on the known elevational distribution of that species and planting those species in multiple common gardens.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student, faculty advisor (Hofstetter) and emeritus faculty (Mike Wagner) will develop an online open data reporting system where citizen volunteers can enter information at any time and in any format. The online site will prompt the entry of specific information on three occasions at about 1 month after planting (April). These monthly reports will ask specific questions about how well the plants are growing, evidence of flowering, pest insects and whether monarchs are present, how many insects, what size, etc. for each of the four milkweed species. The goal of this data collection is to ask the coarse scale ecological questions of whether the plants are doing well and do the monarchs utilize them. This coarse scale approach will help formulate testable alternative hypotheses for future projects. The student will communicate with online users, visit garden sites with Hofstetter and Wagner, learn to give presentation on Monarch conservation, and help develop further methods for Monarch conservation and science.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will learn much about Monarch biology and conservation, have hands on experience working with a high-profile citizen science project, and benefit from the time and 40 years of experience with emeritus faculty Mike Wagner, former Forest Entomology professor at NAU. The student will be able to co-author reports, grants, outreach documents, presentations, and scientific publications related to the project.

Additional qualifications:
The intern must be willing to work with the public. The intern should be comfortable working online and with websites. Some experience (courses or research) in biology, conservation or entomology required.

Time commitment:  4 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Richard Hofstetter, Forestry 

Sp16.005: Assessing the Current Status of Endangered US Plants

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Both plant and animal species have been listed for protection under the Endangered Species Act since 1974, but active steps to “recover” species have been limited, especially for plants. We will review the Recovery Plans on record for endangered US plants and search the published literature as well as government records to explore factors related to actual conservation actions. Important outcomes from this project will include increased public understanding of rare plant status and the identification of plant species in our region that are most deserving of future research.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The research intern will be introduced to the Endangered Species Act and its requirements, including the preparation and adoption of “recovery plans” for species formally listed as threatened or endangered. The intern will work with me in accessing approved recovery plans for endangered plant species in the US, and will collect data on the biological status of those plants. Together we will learn more about the biological characteristics that make some plants more truly endangered (from a conservation perspective) than others.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will gain familiarity with plant diversity, plant identification and taxonomy. The student will also improve understanding of the political, economic, and scientific bases for action or inaction regarding endangered species.

Additional qualifications:
The intern must be comfortable with searching for information on the web. It is desirable to have acquaintance with, or willingness to learn, systematic recording of data in a spreadsheet. It is also desirable to have an interest in plants, botany, and/or conservation.

Time commitment:  5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Laura Huenneke, SESES

Sp16.006: Cryptotephra (Volcanic Ash) in Alaskan Lake Cores

Description of the project that the student intern will support.
The ash erupted from volcanoes serves as an invaluable time marker in geological deposits. The location and analysis of even trace quantities of microscopic volcanic ash grains (cryptotephras) provides important control on the age of the deposits, which is necessary to develop climate histories from frozen sediment (permafrost) and cores taken from multiple Alaskan lakes.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will collect samples from existing Alaskan lake cores and use a heavy liquid separation method to remove cryptotephra grains from the sediment. The grains will be fixed in resin and submitted for chemical analysis by electron microprobe. This will be a great introduction to lab methods for students interested in a science research career.

Other benefits to the student:
This project will provide experience in aspects of scientific research, from sample collection through data analysis. The intern will gain experience in Geology, Chemistry, and lab protocol.

Additional qualifications:
Knowledge of general chemistry or basic lab safety is recommended.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentors: Darrell Kaufman & Katherine Whitacre, SESES

Sp16.007: Novel Approaches to Climate Change Education and Communication

Description of the project that the student intern will support.
I use climate fiction to teach climate change. Climate fiction is a new mode of communication on climate change. I would like to write a paper on climate change communication and education.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will perform a literature review on climate change communication in education and communication journals. The intern will help to summarize and synthesize findings of the literature review. The intern will learn to perform academic research, write in a scholarly fashion, and summarize and synthesize literature.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will benefit from creative and scholarly dialogue with a faculty member. The student will also benefit from working in the honors environment. Weekly meetings will increase the responsibility of the student as well.

Additional qualifications:
Interest in science, education or humanities.

Time commitment:  5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Theodore Martinez, Honors

Sp16:008: Suicide and Hope: Development of Messages to Prevent Suicide using Hope Theory
Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Researchers have been interested in how to design suicide prevention messages without using the term "suicide." Hope Theory by Snyder (2002) might provide a viable strategy for accomplishing this by focusing on goals, pathways to achieve goals and the motivation to pursue those goals. This project will involve having an intern help gather literature on suicide prevention, hope theory and the application of hope theory to suicide prevention research. The intern will help design messages that could potentially be used for a suicide prevention media campaign. Testing of the messages through surveys will be conducted. The intern will be an active participant in the research process.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will help gather research, design messages, and develop and conduct survey research. The intern will be highly involved in the research process.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will learn about the literature, learn how to be an organized and thoughtful researcher.

Time commitment:  3 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
The intern should have had a research methods course.

Additional comments that are relevant:
It is important for interns to be acknowledged for their contributions. I am willing to submit the research to an academic conference so the intern can have this Intern-to-Scholar experience on his or her resume AND a conference presentation.

Faculty mentor: Laura Umphrey, School of Communication
Sp16:009: The Virtual Southside: Creating an Online Walking Tour using Ethnography & Oral Histories

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This is a research/creative project that builds upon the researcher’s experience developing the Historic Southside Mural at the Murdoch Center (2010-2011), and creating online learning tools for residents and visitors to Flagstaff’s Southside neighborhoods. Using oral histories, original videos and audio clips, GIS mapping, transcripts and lesson plans, the student intern will assist the principal researcher in preparing materials for an interactive webpage, linked to sites and historic individuals associated with the Murdoch Community Center mural (e.g, Wilson Riles’s house, Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, South Beaver School, Southwest Lumber Mill, NAU’s Code Talker Statue, Route 66 Train Station). The student will help transcribe videos, upload pictures and audio, and help research historic issues related to Southside’s development, the impact of the Rio de Flag relocation, and shifting demographics within the neighborhoods.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern will help assemble audio-visual materials, transcripts, maps and learning tools for uploading to a dedicated webpage; assist the faculty member in reviewing and researching new and existing oral histories; and assist in developing learning communities and walking tour “docents” who can engage learning online or in person at the Murdoch Community Center. The student intern will learn ethnography and audio-video techniques, the history of “segregation and congregation” in the Southside, and how a virtual walking tour can contribute to campus and community engagement.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern may be able to receive academic credit for their work, and perhaps contribute to a paper or presentation reflecting the ongoing history of the Southside. The experience working with neighborhood residents, participating in research activities at a community center, and helping develop a campus/community walking tour will enrich the student’s grasp of community building and the significance of Ethnic Studies to their own personal and professional development.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
Any experience or interest in audio-visual technologies, Web design, GIS mapping, or community work in the arts or education would be helpful.

Additional comments that are relevant.
Students from all academic backgrounds are encouraged to apply, as they will learn ethnographic techniques, video transcription, and lesson plan development. Course credit and classroom training through the Ethnic Studies Program are available. Enrolled students from other Ethnic Studies courses will provide resources for the intern and possibly help participate as “digital docents” to conduct real and virtual walking tours as the project unfolds. Other Ethnic Studies faculty and community residents can help implement the project at the end of the internship.

Faculty mentor:  Ricardo Guthrie, Ethnic Studies

Sp16:010: The Cloud Procession: A Creative Multimedia (Transmedia) Project

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This is a creative multimedia (transmedia) project. The project consists of an animation, and graphics for a fictional world (virtual reality). The fictional world already exists, in the form of an illustrated book created by Prof. De Toledo, "Chronicles of Entanglement". This project would take the setting and narrative established in the book to produce an animation and digital assets for a virtual reality representation of those settings. The animation and virtual world will be exhibited in galleries and festivals, as well as online.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Under the direction and mentorship of Prof. De Toledo, the student will create graphic assets to be animated (digital and non-digital), as well as contribute to the digital animating process. The student will gain practical experience in working in a fiction animation project, its workflow and technical, conceptual, and creative aspects. Professor De Toledo is an artist, designer, and animator, and teaches motion design/animation and world design at NAU.

Other benefits to the student:
The knowledge and experience acquired in the project will benefit a student interested in a career in animation, game design, broadcast design, or independent film-making. Engaging early in their academic career in a professional project as this will enable the student to take better advantage from future class projects in this area, enhancing the student's ability to produce projects for a portfolio with a competitive edge.

Additional qualifications:
Basic visual arts or visual communication skills. Basic Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator experience.
Basic 3D modeling experience desirable, but not required.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Rodrigo de Toledo, School of Communication

Sp16.011: Monitoring Dynamics from a Year of Elections in Spain

Description of the project that the student intern will support.
2015 was a year of elections in Spain with local, regional and national elections taking place. I am interested in monitoring dynamics of the various elections, with an eye toward understanding the breakdown of bi-partisan politics in Spain and the evolution of a multi-party political system.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Students will become thoroughly acquainted with political dynamics in Spain. Students will review stories from the popular media and identify important issues, dynamics and trends that emerged in the various elections. This research will improve students' ability to think critically about international affairs, and will expose students to diverse methods for organizing political systems.

Other benefits to the student:
Students will develop excellent research, writing, and presentation skills.

Additional qualifications:
* Fluency in Spanish
* Interest in International Affairs
* Careful reader
* Computer skills
* Diligent and hard working

Time commitment:   6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Fred Solop, Politics & International Affairs