Climate Change

Climate Change in the Southwest

The American Southwest, which is already the hottest and driest region of the nation, is likely to become even hotter and drier in the next few decades thanks in part to the ongoing effects of human-generated greenhouse gases.

Tropical Cyclones and the Southwest
It may not be something that shows up on the front page of the Arizona Republic but tropical cyclones have consistently affected the climate of the American Southwest.
Megadroughts in the Southwest
As the climate of the North American Southwest (the Southwest) continues to change, scientists are confident of several things.  Snow cover is projected to decline, average temperatures are set to rise, and we will likely see a decrease in precipitation in most subtropical regions of the world, including the Southwest.
Flooding in the Southwest
The hydrologic cycle is driven by climate. As discussed above, projections indicate that flooding will increase due to changes in soil moisture, as well as increased intensity of storms, less snow, more rain, early spring melt, and a change in land surface. 
El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southwest
The climatic impacts of El Niño and La Niña varies regionally. In the American Southwest, ENSO events are most pronounced during the winter months between December and February. El Niño’s typically generate warmer and wetter years while La Niña events typically lead to cooler and drier years.
Increased Temperatures in the Southwest
The American Southwest (SW), already characterized by an arid climate, is projected to become warmer and drier as a result of GHG. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts an annual average increase of 5-7 degrees F in the SW in the upcoming decades.
North American Monsoon and the Southwest
The North American Monsoon plays an important role in the Southwest bringing up to 80% of annual rainfall to this region. This synchronized availability of precipitation and solar radiation (or sunlight) in the summer benefits the region’s vegetation, which experiences seasonal greening over a range of ecosystems. This seasonal greening usually lasts for a relatively short period of time, but has significant ecological ramifications.

Events

April 22, 2014: Bill McKibben 
"Oil & Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist," The Founder of 350.org
High Country Conference Center- Flagstaff, AZ
April 3, 2014: Climate Science and Solutions
Navajo Generating Station: What is the fate of coal for Northern AZ?
Museum of Northern Arizona - Flagstaff, AZ
March 27, 2014: Climate Science and Solutions
Net Metering: What is a fair rate for residential solar? A Public Discussion
Museum of Northern Arizona - Flagstaff, AZ
February 17, 2014: Climate Science and Solutions
An Evening with Joes Makower, The Guru of Green Business
The W.A. Franke College of Business, Bldg 81, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

November 20, 2013: Climate Science and Solutions
Adapting Land Management in the Southwest in the Face of Changing Climate and Increased Wildfire Risk
La Posada - Winslow, AZ

November 18, 2013: Climate Science and Solutions
Adapting Land Management in the Southwest in the Face of Changing Climate and Increased Wildfire Risk
Museum of Northern Arizona - Flagstaff, AZ

November 8, 2013: Climate Science and Solutions
Adapting Water Resource Management in the Southwest in the Face of Changing Climate
La Posada - Winslow, AZ

November 4, 2013: Climate Science and Solutions
Adapting Water Resource Management in the Southwest in the Face of Changing Climate
Museum of Northern Arizona - Flagstaff, AZ

October 9, 2013: Dr. Gregg Garfin
Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States
Cline Library, Northern Arizona University - Flagstaff, AZ

September 17, 2012: Will deBuys
Hotter and Drier: Living the Life of the 21st Century Southwest
The Orpheum Theatre - Flagstaff, AZ